Online dating marriage divorce

The first piece of evidence against an increase in access to the Internet uses state-by-state comparisons of both divorce rates and Internet access.

The author finds that a 10% increase in the share of households that have access to the Internet in a state is correlated with an 11.6% decline in the state divorce rate.

The implications of this theory is that increased access to online dating will both decrease the probability of divorce (because the quality of marriages increases) and increase the probability of divorce (because married people can continue to search for new partners).

If these two effects offset each other then we should observe in the data an ambiguous relationship between access to the Internet and divorce rates.

Another 21 percent met on social networks, while the rest got to know each other from a mixture of blogs, gaming sites, chat rooms, discussion groups and other online communities.

Other less-frequent meeting places included bars, churches or temples, blind dates and growing up together.

Meetings matter To find out whether meeting place influences the marriage in the long term, Cacioppo and his colleagues analyzed divorces, separations and marital satisfaction among their participants.

They could just be doing what everyone else is doing (i.e. But even without that information, if online dating and social networking sites were a major cause of divorce we would expect to see some evidence of this in a detailed data set like the one used in this analysis. You would be surprised how silent academic research is on this issue.

I haven’t even been able to find any evidence that infidelity is a cause of divorce, so it isn’t that surprising that Internet-aided infidelity is not driving divorce rates.

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